All Fun & Games

Business Continuity Plans; probably the most important, yet undervalued and underfunded, part of your security team. This is the team that deals with what might happen to kill you tomorrow, versus what is actually killing us today. A justifiable investment is very hard to make, because they prove their worth when nothing happens; much like the rest of security, but that nothing is going to happen at some unspecified time in the future.

And then something happens, and the leadership are baying for your blood, crying “why didn’t we do something about this before?”. After an initial flurry of investment and interest, it dies down again to pre-crisis levels, and trhe sequence continues.

Maintaining that level of interest is very difficult in virtually any modern business because of the common demands on any listed company; quarterly earnings reports that continually drive down general and administration costs (you are an overhead there, Mr Security), and lurching from one poor investment briefing to another mean there is little room for “what if” investment.

So let’s play some games instead. If they won’t take its seriously, then neither will we. (That’s supposed to be sardonic, by the way.)

How to test your plans!

Doing tabletop exercises and practising the the plans you have in place is a great way of gaining interest in what it is you are doing, but can be very challenging g to start. The people you are targeting are, after all, the most senior and time poor people in the company. So, let’s start small.

Start with a team within your sphere of influence that has a role to play; maybe the SOC team, and include if you can the departments of peers, such as Legal or Communications. Run a scenario over an hour, record it, document it, create a transcript if need be, and share that report as widely as possible. Make sure you clearly record somewhere that you carried out the test as well, it’s useful fro compliance reasons.

Then rinse and repeat, and each time rely ion the success of the most recent exercise to build the scale and seniority of the exercise. It always surprises me frankly, ho much senior executive try and avoid the exercises, but thoroughly enjoy them when they finally submit to one. it is like they finally see the real world impact of what it is they are doing and the influence they can leverage during times of crisis. I could theorise about the egotistical nature of the phenomenon, but i will leave that to the psychologists and other trick-cyclists.

As the scale of the tests get larger, consider not only running them over longer periods of time and bringing in third parties to manages. This helps in two ways:

  1. You get to be directly involved in the exercise without knowing all the “answers”.
  2. They can bring a level of expertise you won’t have had, as well as tools and bespoke environments to practise with.

These can be run over extended periods, normally no more than a day, but can go beyond if supported. Four hours is a good place to start, with a working lunch in the middle (it helps attract people; everyone loves a free lunch). These third parties may be able to bring additional technology such as a dedicated virtual environment that includes a physically separate network, dedicated laptops, tablets and phones, that ensure the environment is carefully tracked and recorded, and no real world disruptions are encountered. Finally, they can also add real people to interact with, actually phoning the participants, “tweeting” or posting on other social media as part of the exercise, giving an even more realistic feel.

If you want to go extra fancy, you can even run them over multiple geographies, but make sure you can walk before you run!

Given recent circumstances with COVID-19, the lockdown and massive changes to working practises, being able to respond quickly to dramatic changes in the working environment is no longer an exercise in the impossible future, but rather planning on how to operate in a fast moving, ever changing and dangerous environment whilst still maintaining a running and profitable business.

This could be your next tabletop exercise.

That doesn’t sound like a game to me.

Are you trying to get your Business continuity and Crisis Management plans out of the document and into an actual exercise for your business but don’t know how to start? (TL)2 Security can help with everything from your initial plan to a full day exercise. Partnering with industry leading organisations to bring the Situation Room to your business, and ensuring you have real world and actionable improvements and observations at the end of the process, contact (TL)2 Security for more information.

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